Saturday, November 29, 2008

The Greatest Defect of “Present-day” Christianity

A recent conversation brought to mind a quote I had once read by E.M. Bounds. Though he wrote this almost 150 years ago, I believe it is still relevant today in a Christian culture that often claims faith in Jesus is more about being happy than it is about being holy.

It cannot be stated too frequently that the life of a Christian is a warfare, an intense conflict, a lifelong contest. It is a battle, moreover, waged against invisible foes, who are ever alert, and ever seeking to entrap, deceive, and ruin the souls of men. The life to which Holy Scripture calls men is no picnic, or holiday junketing. It is no pastime, no pleasure jaunt. It entails effort, wrestling, struggling; it demands the putting forth of the full energy of the spirit in order to frustrate the foe and to come off, at the last, more than conqueror. It is no primrose path, no rose-scented dalliance. From start to finish, it is war. From the hour in which he first draws sword, to that in which he doffs his harness, the Christian warrior is compelled to "endure hardness like a good soldier.”

It is just at this point in much present-day Christian profession, that one may find its greatest defect. There is little, or nothing, of the soldier element in it. The discipline, self-denial, spirit of hardship, determination, so prominent in and belonging to the military life, are, one and all, largely wanting. Yet the Christian life is warfare, all the way.
(From “Prayer and Vigilance” in The Necessity of Prayer by E.M. Bounds)

No comments:

Post a Comment